Kosuke Okahara

A 70 years old man of the leprosy village of Wuchuan collects firewood after working in the banana field.
A 75 years old villager goes back to his house. He was sent in the village when he was 28 years old.
A 70 years old man of the leprosy village of Wuchuan having a rest after working in the banana field.
Women villagers having a rest under a tree in the afternoon. Despite the difficult life they have endured, they are very open to other people.
A villager having a rest in his room. Most of them are relatively old, over 70 years old.
A villager lying on her bed in the afternoon. Most of them are relatively old, over 70 years old.
The village of ex-leprosy patients. The village is located deep in the mountain. The treck to the village takes over 1 hour from the bottom of the mountain.
Villagers work during the day. They grow corn and raise livestocks to make their living.
A 70 years old man of the leprosy village of Wuchuan. He lives alone in the village.
A 70 years old man of the leprosy village of Wuchuan carries water taken from the well. He lives alone in the village.
A 85 years old woman villager. Many villagers are getting old.
A 75 years old villager writing Chinese characters.
Villagers having a rest in a room. The houses were built some 30 to 50 years ago and some are delapidated.
A 73 years old villager smokes a cigarette. He was sent in the village in 1963.
A coffin placed in the room of a 73 years old villager. In some regions of China, it is said old people live with their coffin.
A villager walks down the mountain to buy fuel in the town. The village is located deep in the mountain.

 

Vanishing existence

– Forgotten leprosy villages in China –

We traveled to visit ex-leprosy colonies located in the far corners of rural China. The only thing that these ex-patients had in common with each other was that they all once had the same disease.

There was a time when the world considered leprosy to be a serious health issue that caused fear among society. Despite this fear ex-patients tend to live quietly in the final part of their lives.

The term Third World is today considered by some to be outdated and as a result a new term, the Fourth World, is being used to describe slum areas in third world countries that are lagging behind in economic development as well as Sub-Saharan Africa, inner city ghettos in the United States, and immigration centers for illegal immigrants in Europe.

One of the characteristics of this new Fourth World is that people are excluded from professions, medical care, and generally any form of social life. In a social context they are not really alive, but then they are not dead either. This reminds me of the leprosy colonies that used to exist through- out the world and if the only conclusion is death for such ‘victims’ then I consider the 30,000 Japanese people who commit suicide every year as part of this new Fourth World.

Does the end of leprosy mean that the human race has achieved one of its main medical goals or does it mean the beginning of a history without any negativity? If we are waiting for the death of ex-patients, and the end of Leprosy, then it is similar to the Fourth World – a space of exclusion.

There were eleven ex-patients living in the village on the other side of the river and we were told that this was the first me they had been visited by foreigners. When our visit was coming to a close they came to say good- bye. When I looked back at the village from our small unsteady rowboat I saw old houses almost to the point of ruin. I’m sure there were people living there. Despite being excluded from society and discriminated against they were open towards strangers like us. The barrier that divided them from society was something other than the width of the river.

I was finishing the journey and witnessing the death of a disease but it felt strange to know that the villagers have not crossed the river in decades, a crossing that had only taken me a few minutes.

Text by Takeshi Nishio