Kosuke Okahara

Sea water in MInamisoma.
À destroyed observation on Usoiso beach in Iwaki city
Young police officers work at the check point of 20km exclusion zone near J-village, the frontline for the nuclear workers.
Three young police officers at the check point of Tsushima district of Namie town located about 27km from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor.
Constructions workers are decontaminating the radioactive substances in Iitate village.
A view of Fukushima city. Poplulation of 290,000, now faces the  fear of radiation though people are getting tired of being cautious and most of people even do not wear a mask.
Mr.Sanbe who used to live right outside of the exclusion zone came to visit to see the cherry blossom near his house on the border of exclusion zone.
Stone lanterns in the shrine just few hundred meters outside of the exclusion zone left as it fell 2 and half years ago when Great Tohoku earthquake hit Japan.
Forest inside 20km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi reactor. THe forest used to be a beautiful place but now radiation level in the forest became quit high which is 5m sv/h.
Takami and Noriko Ohara came to check their abandoned house in the exclusion zone.
Abandoned laundry in front of an abandoned hot spring spa. The place is located 10km from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power plant.
A fallen street lamp post when erathquake hit left as it was.
Car parking of of the big super market inside the exclusion zone.
A portrait of Sanpei family at their new farm where they moved their cow from the high radiation area which was 26km from the reactor.
Tsuyoshi Konno, a cow farmer who took refuge from Namie town after the nuclear explosion now settled in Motomiya, some 50km west of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. He contineus his business under the uncertain circumstance.
An abandoned farm inside 20km exclusion zone from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor. Dead cows are still lying in the farm.This place was visited by the photographer in April 2011 and it was left as it was before.
An abandoned farm inside 20km exclusion zone from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor. Dead cows are still lying in the farm.This place was visited by the photographer in April 2011 and it was left as it was before.
An abandoned farm inside 20km exclusion zone from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor. Dead cows are still lying in the farm.This place was visited by the photographer in April 2011 and it was left as it was before.
Farmers of Minamisoma cleans the farm land that is wiped by Tsunami. However, it is uncertain if they can captivate their farm land again.
Farmers of Minamisoma cleans the farm land that is wiped by Tsunami. However, it is uncertain if they can captivate their farm land again.
In Naraha town, trees grow as no one live and take care of the farmland. A lot of parts in exclusion zone became like jungle.
Momouchi station in Minamisoma. Since the station has been abandoned since the nuclear explosion. The tree grow crazy.
Abandoned railway truck covered with ivy ivied
High school baseball players practice at the ground of Soma Agricultural high school. The baseball team had more players but they all evacuated from the city and only 2 left. The baseball team had more players but they all evacuated from the city and only 2 left.
A tractor washed away by Tsunami stlll stay same spot as no one comes to pick it up or demolish.
Miyakoji district of Tamura city. some 25km west of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear plant now facing the problem of being depoplulation
Water goes into the pacific ocean in Iwaki city. Some 40km south of crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.  One of the biggest problems today is that contaminated water is leaking to the ocean from the nuclear plant.
Noriyuki Sanpei, a junior highschool teacher from Minamisoma stands in front of the sea. "I had never been such close to the sea since the earthquake and Tsunami. I don't know why but I didn't feel like that..."

 

Fukushima Fragment

– Collecting the fragments of the nuclear disaster –

Little by little, I began collecting fragments from the Fukushima disaster.

I photographed moments that said something to me, especially moments that would not disappear in mere seconds. They were scenes that would linger in time, just like the radiation that lingered in Fukushima. I was collecting the fragments of people, ruins, landscapes, little odd scenes, and beautiful moments that existed within the devastation.

“How will people in the future who will see these photographs react and comprehend this disaster?”

I strolled around Fukushima with that question in mind.

It has been more than four years since the explosion of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. People continue living in the region without seeing much amelioration. I have no idea what will happen next.

The only thing I can do is to leave these pictures for the future generations, so that they can learn from history, as well as for them to come to terms with what this disaster truly means.

Winston Churchill once said that, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”

I hope my photographs will serve a purpose.

Kosuke Okahara